PART 3: A guide to semiprecious stones

by Belal El Ghassein January 27, 2017

PART 3: A guide to semiprecious stones

Last but definitely not least, the third part of the guide to semi-precious stones blog series. If you missed the first part or the second part of this guide, go here to check out part one and go here to check out the part two.


In this blog, we will only talk about eight stones as we grouped together some stones that are similar.

21.Bronzite

bronzite stone

Bronzite is a mineral from the pyroxene family. It’s a ferriferous mineral with a bronze-like luster. Most dominant materials in bronzite are magnesium and iron, which gives a chocolate brown color. Deposits of this material are found all over the world: USA, Australia, South Africa, India, Labrador (Canada), Norway and Greenland.

Etymology:

The name was given due to its bronze and chocolate brown color.

Representation:

It represents clarity, protection and youth. It is called the ‘stone of focused action’ and promotes control of one’s actions. In a metaphysical sense, it is thought to help with doubt and indecision.  

Uses:

It is used for ornamental purposes and jewelry. We can find pendulums,  pendants, necklaces and beads made out of bronzite.

  1. Brown tiger eye, blue tiger eye and red tiger eye
brown tiger eye beaded bracelet

Tiger eye is a chatoyant gemstone from the quartz group. It is famous for its golden brown color however, this stone comes in red (dragon’s eye) and blue (hawk’s eye) shades, as well. It is found in Thailand, Australia, Burma (Myanmar), India, South Africa, USA, Brazil, Canada, China (red tiger eye), Korea and Spain.   

Representation:

Tiger eye is considered an ancient talisman that impersonates mystery and power. It represents insight, confidence and balance. The red eye also represents strength. It is thought to enhance integrity and self-confidence. It has a protective feature, as well.  

Uses:

It was used as an amulet in ancient times. Today, it is used for ornaments, decor and jewelry. We can find beaded bracelets, pendants and other small jewelry decorated with this quartz.

23.Botswana agate


Botswana agate is a type of agate crystal that is found in a specific area,  Botswana. To see information about agate stones visit this page where we explain more about agate stones in general.

Representation:

It represents protection, composure and sensuality.The botswana agate is called the ‘change stone’. It is considered to help with handling changes.

Uses:

As the other agate stones, this one as well was used in ancient times for ornamental purposes and jewelry making.

24.Cherry Quartz

cherry quartz beaded bracelet

Cherry quartz is actually not a quartz at all. It’s a glass. To be clear, this ‘quartz’ is man made. It’s dyed and treated to look like rose quartz. (link)

Etymology:

As it is a man made stone it does not.

Representation:

It is thought represent love, comfort and peace. It has similar representation to the rose quartz.

Uses:

It is used in jewelry making and decor.

25.Red coral

red coral beaded bracelet

Just as white and blue coral (link), red coral comes from deep sea waters. The red coral it is also called precious coral. This type of coral is frequent in the Mediterranean sea on the coast of Greece. It is the most sought after type of coral due to its intense red and/or pink-ish color.

Etymology:

The name comes from the latin ‘corallium rubrum’, later used by greeks as ‘korallion’.

Representation:

It represents metabolism, balance and harmony. It is thought to offer support in marital life. Also, it helps finish tasks and reach objectives.

Uses:

It was and it still is used in jewelry making. Jewelry makers love it because it’s durable material. It is actually, the skeletons of dead sea animals.  

26.Red jade

It’s a metamorphic rock, composed of different minerals. It comes in many colors such as green, blue, orange, white and red. The red jade is considered to be the most passionate color among these.

Etymology:

Jade is derived from French ‘l’ejade’  and the Latin ‘lilia’. 1565 records show that the Spanish called this stone ‘piedra de ijada’

Representation:

It represents vitality, strength and passion. It helps in overcoming addictions such as alcohol and smoking. It provides support for warriors and martial arts practitioners. It is thought to be a healing stone, as well.  

Uses:

Jade was well-known stone among many cultures. It was used for ornamental and decoration purposes. It was used for making knives and other weaponry, too. Today, it is mostly used in jewelry making and decoration.

27.Smoky quartz


Like other stones from the quartz family, smoky quartz is a silicon dioxide crystal. It can be totally transparent or it can have a brownish yellow color which gives a smoky effect. 

Etymology:

Quartzes come in thousands of varieties so here is a general definition of the word quartz. In ancient Greek it was called ‘krustallos’ which means ‘icy cold’. It was thought to a cooled variation of ice.

Representation:

It represents endurance, pride  and perception.

Uses:

In terms of history this stone was not given special attention but in recent times the smoky quartz is heavily used in jewelry making.

28.Sandalwood

sandalwood beaded bracelet

Sandalwood is a type of tree that grows slowly and both the oil and the wood have extracted from this tree have distinctive fragrances. It was used in many cultures such as India, Greece and Rome, dating back 4000 years.   

Representation:

It represents purity sensuality and strength.

Uses:

It is used for multiple purposes, from skin remedies to aphrodisiac and to jewelry making. We can find beads, necklaces, jewelry boxes made out of this wood.

So, that was it... We hope these blogs helped you in finding out more about these stones and gemstones.






Belal El Ghassein
Belal El Ghassein

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